Inside GNSS Media & Research

JUL-AUG 2018

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Navigation

Page 40 of 59

www.insidegnss.com J U L Y / A U G U S T 2 0 1 8 Inside GNSS 41 keeping their main antennas oriented towards Earth and allowing the naviga- tion payload to be switched on. Testing the Signals for Navigation With Galileo 5 and 6 having reached a more suitable orbit for navigation pur- poses, the In-Orbit Test (IOT) campaign could start and the navigation payloads were switched on. The IOT campaign was conducted from the ESA tracking station in Redu, Belgium, where the sat- ellite broadcast navigation signal was monitored using the 20 meter L-band antenna to study the strength and shape of the navigation signals at high resolu- tion with support from experts from OHB System AG – the satellite manufac- turer in Bremen, Germany and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) – the payload manufacturer in Guildford, UK. First, the various payload elements, especially the Passive Hydrogen Maser (PHM) atomic clock, were warmed up, then the payload's first signal in space (SIS) was transmitted. Galileo 5, the first Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellite transmitted its first navigation signal on November 29, 2014. Its navi- gation signal-in-space, transmitting in the three Galileo frequency bands (E1/ E5/E6), was tracked by Galileo Test User Receivers deployed at various locations in Europe, namely Redu in Belgium, the European Space Research and Technol- ogy Centre (ESTEC), Noordwijk in the Netherlands, Weilheim in Germany and Rome in Italy. The quality of the signal was confirmed to be in line with expectations. Galileo 6 navigation pay- load IOT was successfully completed in March 2015. e successful results of the tests of the navigation signal were excel- lent news for Galileo, confirming the good design of the rest of the satellites which had yet to be launched. Furthermore, navigation message upload tests and Galileo-only position fix using Galileo 5 (GSAT0201) in com- bination with In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites Galileo 1, 2 and 3 (GSAT0101, 0102 and 0103) were successfully carried out in December 2014 demonstrating the excellent payload performance com- parable to that expected in the nominal orbit and the potential of Galileo 5 to operate as part of the Galileo system ( Figure 5 ). In preparation for the operational use of the satellites, ESA carried out an assessment of the operational benefits of Galileo 5 and 6 as part of the Galileo system and recommended some Ground Segment modifications required to sup- port the future operational use of these satellites. The Ground Mission Seg- ment (GMS) required modification to enable the processing and generation of navigation messages for Galileo 5 and 6 and uplink via both the S-band uplink by Telemetr y Tracking and Control (TT&C) stations and via the C-band Delivering Aviation Approved GPS Solutions…Worldwide. www.aspennexnav.com Copyright 2017 Aspen Avionics Inc. "Aspen Avionics," "NexNav", "MAX," "Micro-i," and the Aspen Avionics aircraft logo are trademarks of Aspen Avionics Inc. All rights reserved. U.S. Patent No. 8,085,168, and additional patents pending. Approved NexNav ™ GPS solutions for the aerospace industry have a well-proven track record in civil and military, manned and unmanned applications. • GPS-SBAS circuit card assemblies and GPSSUs • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations • Made in U.S.A. • Go to www.aspennexnav.com for more information Compact Size • Small size, lightweight and low power consumption • Approved for ADS-B OUT position source • Approved for enroute, terminal and approach GPS navigation • Products meet all expected GPS requirements for UAS BVLOS operations

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